The Hill is a microdistrict in Veliky Ustyug. This name came from the street Red Hill, which is located on the outskirts of the city on a hill. The edge of the hill is nothing else than the ancient bank of the river Sukhona, under which the river flowed at the beginning of the 10th century.

Now the neighborhood is a large developed residential area with kindergartens, schools and many other various institutions and organizations. On the Hill there was a large St. John the Baptist Monastery, which was later partially destroyed and reformed into a brush factory.

This time I walked selectively through some quarters and captured those objects that I did not have in the archive.

For example, this is a long two-story barn across from the usual five-story apartment building.

One exactly the same located very near burned in 2013. A playground has now been built on the site of a burnt-down barn, and the rest of the place was taken by the cars of the residents of the house.

In adjacent courtyard a long one-story barn has been preserved.

Any small shopping center could quietly appear in this place. All ahead.

On Sakharov Street there are a lot of wooden houses, as well as preserved working stone wells.

The house has two entrances, but its layout is not quite standard.

According to tradition, there is a barn in the courtyard, where the residents put things they do not need, which is a pity to throw in the garbage. I don’t argue that someone has used shed for storing bicycle-moto equipment, storing food or wood for kindling a bath...but often there is just trash.

Initially, the Hill microdistrict was wooden, like the whole Veliky Ustyug. It is already in the 50-60-s began to build apartment buildings of brick.

Some houses were built in the late 80s and early 90s, but in some places wooden apartment barracks can still be found.

And with them are barns. This is for granted.

All the pieces are still in good condition - in recent years, no such residential building on the Hill has been declared dilapidated.

Symbiosis of houses of different generations.


Canon 6d, EF 17-35 / 2.8L