Havey’s Australia & New Zealand Adventure Part 25 – Central Otago, New Zealand

nickyhavey
Nicky Havey @nickyhaveya month ago · 8 min read
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"On Yer Bike"

In today's post, we're replacing our hiking boots from our walk around Lake Te Anau with cycling shoes as we take to two wheels and bike around one of New Zealand's great trails in Central Otago. Thankfully in this part of the world, weather systems move by quickly and it was a lot more favourable compared to the day before, which gave some great views on the ride along with an awesome sunset at nearby Blue Lake. So put on your helmet and join me for a cheeky bike ride across some of New Zealand's glorious terrain!

This blog is optimised for the Travel Feed website so make sure you view it there for the best experience - link at the bottom of this post.

Getting To Wedderburn, Central Otago

The journey out of the Fjordlands National Park, specifically Te Anau, will take you about 3 hours and 45 minutes on a good day without stopping. For us, the weather was pretty miserable and we had a few breaks so we were probably looking at around 5 hours total travel time (this was after our morning hike in Te Anau) to get there. Effectively, we retraced our route back to Queenstown and then headed east on "good ol'" Highway 6 before heading north on Highway 85 to get to Wedderburn.

The route from Te Anau to Wedderburn
The route from Te Anau to Wedderburn

If you have clearer weather, the views would definitely be more spectacular as you get back to Queenstown along the stretch of road known as the "Devil's Staircase". I think we were all just happy we had a roof over us as we were looking out of the window at this dramatic landscape being battered by the rain.

Views from the Devil's Staircase...
Views from the Devil's Staircase...

...it certainly was hellish conditions anyway!
...it certainly was hellish conditions anyway!

Otago Central Rail Trail

As the name suggests, this used to be a railway which was originally completed at the beginning of the 20th century. It was a vital link between Central Otago and Dunedin up until 1990 when other transport mechanisms such as driving and flying allowed people to move around a bit more freely [Source]. Other parts of the train line are still in operation but the part we're going to be exploring has been fully converted and is known for being one of New Zealand's great bike rides.

If you're a keen cyclist, or even if you're not, I'd highly recommend riding a section in a day trip, or if you're feeling up for it, the whole 152km over the course of a few days. For us, we went for a small 35km section of it as we hired bikes from a company called She Bikes He Bikes. Day hire ranges from $40 NZD per bike (for a group booking) or $45 NZD (if it's just you) and you contact them to meet up before hand. For us, we needed to get from where we were staying in Wedderburn to Lauder, heading west along Highway 85 for 25 minutes or so - as you can see, the weather vastly improved overnight!

It's just a case of heading west on Highway 85 to pick up our bikes...
It's just a case of heading west on Highway 85 to pick up our bikes...

...and the weather vastly improved compared to the day before!
...and the weather vastly improved compared to the day before!

The landscape really opens up as we head to the pick up point - there's excitement in the air!
The landscape really opens up as we head to the pick up point - there's excitement in the air!

When we arrived to pick up our bikes, the guide mentioned that hundreds of thousands of people ride or walk The Rail Trail every year and that it's pretty well maintained so there's no fear of falling down pot holes or anything like that. OK, there were a few rough patches but actually, it was pretty smooth going! Want to go for a ride? Grab your bike then!

Let's go for a ride!
Let's go for a ride!

From Lauder, we join the trail heading back the way we just came, crossing this little bridge over a creek and get ourselves away from the highway.

Looking east back towards the highway...
Looking east back towards the highway...

...but we're heading that a-way!
...but we're heading that a-way!

Manuherikia No. 1 Bridge

From this little creek, the trail climbs gradually up to our first main landmark called the "Manuherikia No. 1 Bridge", which helps us get across the Manuherikia River. This is the second longest bridge on the Rail Trail at 110.6m and it was the first time that concrete was used in construction along it. It's also only one of two bridges on the trail that are curved. "Manuherekia" is the Moari spelling and actually means "tied bird", want to have a look?

The "Manuherikia No. 1 Bridge"
The "Manuherikia No. 1 Bridge"

After this bridge, the left side of the trail opens out spectacularly to give us wonderful views of the countryside. If you get a great day like we did, why not stop and take it all in, we won't say anything about you being out of breath haha!

Take the opportunity to enjoy the countryside views on the trail...
Take the opportunity to enjoy the countryside views on the trail...

Your customary bike shot... that's what cyclists do right?!
Your customary bike shot... that's what cyclists do right?!

OK, let's hop back on and make our way up there!
OK, let's hop back on and make our way up there!

Poolburn Gorge

As the trail bends around to the right, you'll notice the landscape change to something that looks a little more baron due to the hot, dry summers and cold winters. This is the Poolburn Gorge and makes up a few km section of this part of the cycle trail. The Māori name for the gorge is "Te Waipapapa o Karetai" which translates as the "water container of Karetai", who was a chief of Ngai Tahu [Source].

The Poolburn Gorge...
The Poolburn Gorge...

...with shrubbery and schist rock being prominent features here.
...with shrubbery and schist rock being prominent features here.

Along the Poolburn Gorge section, you'll come across a couple of tunnels which you aren't allowed to cycle down. Instead, you should disembark and walk through it but be warned...it's VERY dark in there! If you're afraid of the dark, don't worry as it doesn't last for long although it is kinda cool if you say something and hear it echo around! This first tunnel is the longer one at around 229m (751ft) long and has a slight bend in it.

Just before the tunnel, the trail cuts through the rock...
Just before the tunnel, the trail cuts through the rock...

...then you're greeted with this...
...then you're greeted with this...

...errr... hmmm... well, here goes...!
...errr... hmmm... well, here goes...!

It sure is dark in here... day light looks a long way away...
It sure is dark in here... day light looks a long way away...

Phew! Made it!
Phew! Made it!

After this first tunnel, you find yourself in the depth of the gorge with some pretty great views, be sure to admire them before you get back on your bike!

Great views of the Poolburn Gorge after the tunnel
Great views of the Poolburn Gorge after the tunnel

It's not long until you get back on the trail again that you come across the second tunnel. Both of them were cut by "blasting", with the rocks consisting of schist and lined at either end with bricks. If you have a torch with you, you can see how the layers of rock, schist rubble and brick lining work together and where each material ends inside the tunnel. Here's that second tunnel now, thankfully it's a little shorter than the first one at 201m (659ft)! There's a little information board nearby with pictures on how they did it, impressive stuff really!

You can see the brick work at the entrance of the tunnel, which lasts for around 10m before the bare rock is exposed inside
You can see the brick work at the entrance of the tunnel, which lasts for around 10m before the bare rock is exposed inside

Poolburn Viaduct

The final part of Poolburn Gorge is the 2nd bridge we need cross called the "Poolburn Viaduct". This is the tallest bridge on the trail and stands at 37 metres tall, with a length of 108 metres. It took 3 years to construct from 1901 to 1904 with the foundations built of schist rock according to the nearby information board.

The Poolburn Viaduct comes in to view...
The Poolburn Viaduct comes in to view...

...and offers great views across the gorge...
...and offers great views across the gorge...

...ruined by this guy!
...ruined by this guy!

Your customary bike shot :)
Your customary bike shot :)

The Poolburn Viaduct
The Poolburn Viaduct

The last section of the trail that we did was a few km on from Poolburn Viaduct. The view opens out beautifully on the south side across the valley around Central Otago which you can't keep your eyes off. Plenty of sheep in these parts wishing you a good day on the farm land and there's a great downhill section that allows you to get up some speed if you're feeling courageous! I was still bouncing off the energy from the adventures in Queenstown so really went for it... according to my speedometer, I clocked up around 50km/h (30+ mph) on the gravel track! Amazing to feel the wind in your ears :)

Views across the south side of the trail after Poolburn Viaduct
Views across the south side of the trail after Poolburn Viaduct

You may make some new friends!
You may make some new friends!

After you've ended the downhill section, it flattens out a bit...
After you've ended the downhill section, it flattens out a bit...

...onwards we go...
...onwards we go...

...and enjoy some of the final views of the bike ride!
...and enjoy some of the final views of the bike ride!

If you're visiting this part of New Zealand, definitely get involved on this cycle trail! It's thoroughly enjoyable, relatively easy going and the views are pretty damn good! If you want a profile of the gradient and distances involved, have a look at the image below taken from Shebikeshebikes and decide which section you want to do, or, if you're brave enough, all of it! [Image Source]

Profile of the Central Otago Rail Trail
Profile of the Central Otago Rail Trail

Blue Lake

If you want a really relaxing place to enjoy sunset after your amazing bike ride, I'd highly recommend a visit to "Blue Lake" in St Bathans area. From Wedderburn, where we were staying, it's about a 25 minute drive, maybe longer because once you get off the Highway, there's gravel road sections which will slow you down. However, it is well worth it!

Getting to Blue Lake from Wedderburn
Getting to Blue Lake from Wedderburn

The lake itself was originally a gold mine, being the deepest in the Southern Hemisphere in the 1860s, but be aware that it is man-made so if you're dead set on "nature only", you may be disappointed. It is still stunning though and a great place to learn about the once, thriving miners town where people lived through tough conditions in the hope of striking gold. Have a look for yourselves!

Walking up to the Blue Lake gives a great view...
Walking up to the Blue Lake gives a great view...

...and birds fly down below (maybe they are still looking for gold), we can join them...
...and birds fly down below (maybe they are still looking for gold), we can join them...

Aha! We've found the golden sphere!
Aha! We've found the golden sphere!

After the sun goes down, the temperature quickly drops and it's time to get back to the warm fire in our accommodation!
After the sun goes down, the temperature quickly drops and it's time to get back to the warm fire in our accommodation!

Accommodation

The place we stayed at was the "36 Railway Station Road Guest House" which looks like it has since gone up for sale since we stayed there in May 2019! So if you're interested in buying it, here's a link to the estate agents lol! How's that for timing? Looks like we must have been the last people to stay there! Nonetheless, if you're planning on doing the full trail and want some places to stay, here's a very helpful link showing ALL the accommodation available along the trail.

The helpful map from the Otago Rail Trail website shows all available accommodation.
The helpful map from the Otago Rail Trail website shows all available accommodation.

So there you have it folks, a day in Central Otago to give you a few ideas for when you visit. There's much more to do around here including hiking but hopefully you've had enough of a taster to whet your appetite!

Until the next time, take it easy

Nicky


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wwwiebe
wwwiebe @wwwiebea month ago

That looks so beautiful, and so flat! I love bike riding on flat highways and paths; it's one of the best feelings in the world. And yes, cyclists take 'bike photos'. I know I have! :)

Love the map at the bottom. My first thought was, 'damn, Nicky really got around!'


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Yes there's something very pleasant about riding on flat ground and letting the bike drift as you let gravity take control!

Haha yes would have been a lot more broken than I was if I did the full 152km 😂 I was still damaged after the 35 km we actually did!


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Excellent photography @nickyhavey, it's like I'm right there with you. 👍👍


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Thanks for checking it all out mate! Glad you enjoyed the journey here, now we can relax in the pub 😁


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How on earth do you remember so much after your trip? I would have forgotten everything before I even left the country!


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Haha, it is a bit of a challenge I have to admit but I took photos, lots of photos, made some notes when I was out there and lots of research over the last few days to make sure I have done the best I can with it all 😊


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This post was curated by @theluvbug
and has received an upvote and a resteem to hopefully generate some ❤ extra love ❤ for your post!
JOIN ME ON TWITTER

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In Proud Collaboration with The Power House Creatives
and their founder @jaynie


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Thanks a lot @Jaynie! Needed that luvbug now more than ever 😊


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Yay! Another great adventure for me to read through!! Thanks Nicky!


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Haha thanks for coming on it with me man! Glad you enjoyed this 😀


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I wish the travel will not stop but I know it's just a dream. 😊


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As a dutchie I am a huge cyclist offcourse and I am so jealous of your trip love it


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Haha thanks for joining in the cycle @brittandjosie! I know there were cycles everywhere in Netherlands when I visited, seemed to be more bikes than people! Definitely less people in New Zealand, lovely 😊


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doon
Doon @doona month ago

Excellent capture of this beautiful ride! Extremely thorough and some amazing places, well done.


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Thanks a lot man! Glad you enjoyed coming on the bike ride with me here! I'd love to go back and do the whole 152km the next time I visit, some beautiful scenery in New Zealand 😀


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Congratulations! Your high-quality travel content was selected by @travelfeed curator @for91days and earned you a reward, in form of an upvote and a resteem. Your work really stands out! Your article now has a chance to get featured under the appropriate daily topic on our TravelFeed blog.
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Dudes! Wow! Thank you @travelfeed and @for91days for the support here!

Probably the smoothest experience I had so far posting via travelfeed.io and just have one feedback I left in the Discord! You guys are kicking some serious A!


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Thank you soo much for sharing your thoughts .. it helps us so much!


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@steeflagrewards bidbot usage

https://steemit.com/steemleader/@mysearchisover/steemleader-abuse-stats-140790-23-638


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Oh dear, check my wallet dear friend...


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Yep I sent it. #protest lol


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Well good luck with your protest I guess 👍


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#protest #rampage lol

Why are people so mean and dumb on here? lol

Thanks though. I'd rather have done things the nicer way. I respectfully asked for the flags to be removed but I don't think I will be nice anymore.


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I haven't flagged you though?

I've done some downvotes on posts that I thought were massively over rewarded on the trending page of various accounts but I always explain why and try to give constructive feedback.

You might want to check out a post by xpilar as well - it's the open letter to downvoters/flaggers (I was tagged in that but seems I was the only one replying from those that were tagged). Check my comments there as they explain everything from my point of view but I'm not out to get anyone here. I want steem to thrive and I think we should all encourage each other but I might just be the exception after reading through things this weekend...

Always been told I'm way too optimistic 😂


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Downvoted due to a disagreement with the rewards given to the post.

Sorry to hear about the issues with steemleo. Do they have a discord you can go into and use to ask for help? Most tribes do

Posted using Partiko Android

I also used a bidbot to boos my rewards

@steemflagrewards bidbot used to boost rewards

https://steemit.com/steemleader/@mysearchisover/steemleader-abuse-stats-140790-23-638


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Well, since HF21, I wouldn't recommend anyone to use bid bots anymore unless you set post payouts to "decline rewards" or set beneficiary to @null. Seems that's the general consensus now in the community from what I've seen.

I think you should probably take your issue/protest with those who have actually been downvoting your posts or go to steemflagrewards Discord?


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Are you a member of the Steemit.com team?
Is there a ban on using bid bots?


-10

No I am not a member of steemit.com man. I'm not a member of any flagging team or anything like that. I'm just a travel blogger & music producer wanting steem to thrive 🙂

But I keep a strong interest on how things are and what's going on around here - what I said in the previous comment is my observations and experience.

Bid bots have now turned to manual curation and the steem community doesn't want bid botted posts to appear on trending as it means anyone can get there with a couple of lines of text or a picture that took less than 5 minutes. Particularly if you're keeping the post payouts to yourself.

If we want to attract top content creators and, what this place really needs, content consumers then we need to take the trending page very seriously as that's where people will go to first and foremost.

That's why I said if you're going to use bidbots, set beneficiary to @null or decline post payouts, it will save you a lot of stress!

I'm trying to help you out here


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I think the trending page at steemleo.com is pretty good. https://www.steemleo.com/trending/

Perhaps after the #abuse ends towards me on steemit.com I can help improve the trending page.


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Yes I agree I think all these different tribes and communities away from steemit are a lot more "organic". I don't use steemleo but sonicgroove or tunes if I post a music post.

But sadly, steemit.com is still where most folks go by the looks of it (from data I've seen from other steemians).

Well I hope you get those issues you're having resolved. I know what it's like, had it at the beginning of the year and I've been in enough conversations this weekend about downvotes 😂

Take it easy hey


10

You too. If you have any more issues feel free to let me know.


5

And a very good biking route it looks. The lake area photos are all my favorites, but the bridge and tunnel are also cool.


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Thanks for joining me on the ride man! Yea the lake is beautiful and some sections of the trail are amazing scenery too. Thank goodness we had the weather we did because it was looking ominous the day before!


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So right place, right time, right weather :) The rest can be random.


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Give me those 3 things any time. Right people is a nice 4th if possible!


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